I got this weird fender pawnshop reverse jaguar bass the other day because it was super cheap and I’ve had this strange idea for a short or medium scale bass kicking around in my head for awhile.

I’m thinking of adding a “bassist” to SISSYS which has always been a baritone/drums two-piece but a standard bass would end up getting played fairly high because of the range I always end up writing it in. I also generally dislike the tone of a five string or b tuned bass guitar. So this is my possible solution…

I’ve basically got it set up as a 4 string baritone tuned b-e-a-d with skinnyish strings gauges 34-72 from a bass vi set. The 32 inch scale and higher tuning add a lot of snap and punch to notes and it still sounds quite like a bass guitar. I might even call it twangy with the bridge pickup. Chording is very interesting and there’s not nearly as much muddiness as with chording on a standard bass. Dirt pedals sound huge and even with my smallish piggyback stack it’s got a super thick and gritty low end. It’s definitely very interesting and inspiring in this tuning and I plan on keeping it as is for the foreseeable future.

Ok I’ve gotta go try it with some bigger amps and a bass amp now. Bye

This thing is super wacky but I like it. Sorta fenderbirdish? The neck is dreamy with that 32 inch scale length though. And for $300? Yes please.

Oops I did it again…

Fairchilds Meet Maude is finally on my board and I can’t stop playing with her.
When I picked it up I also tried the moog minifooger delay, dba ghost echo, and dba echo dream 2. This was the clear winner although that moog delay is a near perfect “normal” analog delay.
Here’s a breakdown of what makes this analog delay so unique and special…

1 - there’s a compressor in the delay path.
This means that runaway self oscillation does not get obnoxiously loud and make you worry about blowing speakers. You can also play right through self oscillation without having your clean signal completely drowned out. You can play one chord and let it feedback for a bit, play a new chord, and then actually hear the old one fade away as the new chord fades in. This, as far as I know, is completely unique in the analog delay game. It’s almost sort of like a “ducking” delay. If you’ve got a delay with an effects loop it might be worth trying a compressor in there?

2 - the modulation rate and depth are both completely random.
The modulation toggle selects between off, light, and heavy. On both the light and heavy settings the modulation is gorgeous, somewhat subtle, and very natural. Sometimes you’ll hear very quick and intense jumps in pitch followed by slow and mellow wobble. It completely reminds me of dudes that use subtle/random trem bar or neck bends with their delay.

3 - cv/effects loop
There’s a jack next to the output jack that can be configured as a cv expression jack for delay time, feedback, both delay and feedback together, or used as a trs effects loop. I’m running a little external switch I built to toggle between short and long delay times.

Literally my only complaint is the stupid side mounted jacks. I’ve told you I hate side mounted jacks right?

So why do I need another analog delay next to my incredible deluxe memory man?
Because I’ve got the 1100 and while it is amazing, the additional delay time means that shorter delays are much more clear and defined than other memory men. It doesn’t do that sort of atmospheric, wash of delay thing that the deluxe memory man is known for unless it’s set for much longer delays. I actually thought about trading it for the shorter delay time of the 550 model but I love those super warm yet very defined delays the 1100 does. The Fairchild delay does the atmospheric wash of delay thing so good and complements the memory man remarkably well. Both of them at the same time is unbelievable.

Back from honeymoon.
Built myself this bypass box yesterday with two loops for switching the back row of my board. I somehow managed to cram six quarter inch jacks and a mini dc jack all on the rear of a 1590s which is a bit smaller but taller than a 1590bb. It’s super tight but as long as it’s on the edge of a pedaltraiin row with space underneath it works. Side mounted jacks are stupid. This thing takes up less space than the MXR single loop box I was using before. Did I mention side mounted jacks are stupid?
Also bypass boxes boxes are an incredible and simple way to practice off board wiring.
Ok bye

Done.
This thing is gonna be amazing next to my memory man.
It’s already killing me that I won’t be home to play it for another week. Seriously brilliant pedal.

I got to play fairfields “meet maude” analog delay yesterday and I’m in love. I would never use the word flexible to describe most analog delays but this thing is tres flexible. The tone control is dreamy. You can actually get verge of oscillation infinite repeats that aren’t out of control. Definitely gonna try to pick one up.
Also if you’re ever in Montreal or Toronto Moog Audio is heaven.
http://fairfieldcircuitry.com/products/meet-maude

schrodingersdelaypedal:

420lbsound:

fuckyeaheffectspedals:

Hey there!
This is my first build since I just got into it. It’s a Distortion + with the mods proposed by baritones in his tumblr and an obvious Converge reference for name.

Submitted by dontlose-hope

Oh, cool! That’s rad, man. Hope to see more from you. Always encouraging people to build. It’s always cool to have the ability to create your own sounds from scratch. Total control. and Darrell knows what’s up. 

Sweeeeet.

I love this.

I also love this.

sirsf:

Vintage super reverb with additonal chopped super reverb head

The best thing about this if it works is the jack in place of the speed knob on the head! Expression control of amp trem could be glorious. I guess it could just be a broken pot though…

(via 420lbsound)

I JUST GOT MARRIED!
#darrellandshauna

baritones:

Today I found this wacky Ibanez PDS1 that I’d never even heard of for $40 at a pawn shop.
I was like “this is gonna sound terrible but it’s interesting and cheap so whatever”
I was pleasantly surprised to get it home, plug it in, and find that it sounds awesome!
I guess it’s an all analog but digitally controlled SM9 super metal circuit with 19 presets!
Editing is a bit of a pain as always with old stuff like this but once I’ve got it set up it should be pretty mindless.
This thing would be a great pedal to just throw in a guitar case for some random jam when you’re not sure what you might need. It’s got a pretty huge range of tones from almost ts9 style light drive all the way through crunchy scooped metal. Plus the dry out could be super handy.
This was a very good accident.

I guess there’s four other pedals in this series:
http://www.effectsdatabase.com/model/ibanez/dcp
Plus a midi interface to control up to 4 pedals at once.
I’m very tempted try to get my hands on a PDM1.
And here’s a somewhat ok/somewhat cheesy demo of a few of them…
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=CPHpKQ_RhdQ

After digging in to this guy for a day I’m really enjoying it.
It sounds fantastic and I’m loving the low end crunchiness.
And here’s the best thing about it compared to a standard knob controlled pedal…
It’s got two modes:
Sound mode - this is where you can edit your patches and switch patches manually.
Play mode - this mode lets you program ten separate sequences of ten patches each.
When you press the footswitch in this mode it advances to the next patch in the sequence. This means I could set up a sequence for a specific song and each time I press the switch I could get a completely different tone (including bypass) all within the same pedal.
For some reason in that mode I feel like Neil Young using his “whizzer” or something. I can’t even tell you how much I want a tweed deluxe/whizzer…

I really feel like this sort of set up, with modern day technology, applied to a super flexible circuit (like a musket?) could be extremely usable. Probably with rotary encoders though. Editing patches with those buttons is a pain and not even close to doable on the fly.

Today I found this wacky Ibanez PDS1 that I’d never even heard of for $40 at a pawn shop.
I was like “this is gonna sound terrible but it’s interesting and cheap so whatever”
I was pleasantly surprised to get it home, plug it in, and find that it sounds awesome!
I guess it’s an all analog but digitally controlled SM9 super metal circuit with 19 presets!
Editing is a bit of a pain as always with old stuff like this but once I’ve got it set up it should be pretty mindless.
This thing would be a great pedal to just throw in a guitar case for some random jam when you’re not sure what you might need. It’s got a pretty huge range of tones from almost ts9 style light drive all the way through crunchy scooped metal. Plus the dry out could be super handy.
This was a very good accident.

I guess there’s four other pedals in this series:
http://www.effectsdatabase.com/model/ibanez/dcp
Plus a midi interface to control up to 4 pedals at once.
I’m very tempted try to get my hands on a PDM1.
And here’s a somewhat ok/somewhat cheesy demo of a few of them…
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=CPHpKQ_RhdQ

Ghost Effects Silicon Pep Box (kit) review:
http://www.ghosteffects.co.uk/

I’m writing this review because it seems like the pep box is a completely under the radar circuit that most have yet to hear. I’m fairly sure if the original wem/rush version had been more available that it would be as popular and desirable as a superfuzz or companion fuzz or something like that. Also ghost effects deserves more love.

I built this kit ages ago. It was the first thing I built that wasn’t a bazz fuss, muff fuzz or one of their variants. Basically a test for myself to see how capable I was of actually building a legit pedal. Mine didn’t turn out too pretty and it definitely doesn’t sound pretty either….

The pep box is a LOUD, nasty, gritty, and very gated fuzz unlike any fuzz I’ve ever played. The original only had controls for volume and pep (aka fuzz) and sounds pretty thin. Not necessarily in a bad way though. The range of tones available from those two controls is fairly limited but thankfully the ghost effects pcb has extra pads to add a tone control configured as an output capacitor blend to add more bass and totally thicken things up. For my tastes it is a little bit on the bright side even with the bass cranked but with bright fuzz pedals like this or a scrambler/superfuzz etc I’ll usually stack a mid gain dirt pedal like a rat after it to even things out.

My favourite use for this pedal is with power chords or leads played very staccato which really emphasizes the gated nature of this fuzz.

The ghosts effects kit is quite reasonably priced and includes a very nice pcb and all of the components to populate the board. It’s up to the builder to source the rest (enclosure, jacks, pots, switch etc). Ian was very pleasant to deal with and helped me out with biasing and some transistor issues I was having (completely my fault). It’s very rad of him to even offer these kits since he mostly sells these things completed for a much higher price. He also finally started selling kits for the wem project V which I am definitely gonna check out because of my infinite love for Brian Eno.

Definitely check out ghost effects. He’s got some rad pedals and his tagboard work is breathtaking.
http://www.ghosteffects.co.uk/

blnk page dirt update.

Some of you have been asking what’s going on with these pedals I was gearing up to start selling ages ago so here’s an update…
I had some time booked off work to build a small batch of a couple circuits (a fuzz and a drive/distortion) in late April.
Then I got sick.
Bronchitis and pneumonia.
I was able to power through and finish a batch of the 1995/scuzz but that was super tough due to the amount of fatigue my body was in at the time.
Once I got better I started testing out my dirt circuit (1987/thedriver) with tons of different guitars and amps. It sounded perfect to me with my own gear but testing it through other amps with different guitars sent me back to the drawing board to make the thing more versatile with different set ups.
Fast forward to July and I’ve finally got a flexible pedal that can adapt to different rigs and captures the best elements of a range of classic hard clippers (DOD250/dist+/Rat/maxon od-01). Now I’m fully ready to start building these things.
Then I get hit in the back of the head (knockout game) which I am still very slowly recovering from. I’ve still got sort of blurry vision (which has made soldering boards super difficult) and feel like a huge pile of shit if I don’t get at least 10 hours of sleep every night.
Add to all of this my dumb full time job and the fact that I’m getting married in 12 days and you can sorta get the picture…

So basically once I’m back from my honeymoon in mid September I’m gonna build like crazy and finally get these things between some peoples guitars and amps.

What you should expect from blnk page dirt:
Anything I make should be usable for bass/baritone/standard guitar/anything you wanna plug into it.
No straight up clones. Ever.

1987/thedriver - classic hard clipping od/distortion with minimal loss of bottom end, zero fizz, flexible tone control, and a huge range of dirt from semi-clean 250 style boost (with an obscene amount of volume on tap) to super thick rat style grit.

1995/scuzz - thick gritty fuzz all the way back to shrill treble boost. Shit-tons of volume. Very interactive with a guitars volume and tone pots. Endless sustain. Controllable harmonic feedback. A surprising amount of different tones from two deceptively simple controls. This one has been a big hit with a handful of locals. Probably more like a van full.

Potentially available down the road:
1: Something based loosely on the ampeg scrambler with an added rat style filter. I own a reissue and have access to an original so I’m not talking outta my ass on this one… The scrambler is one of the brightest pedals ever made and normally hates being in a chain with any sort of buffer. It also despises humbuckers. I’m pretty close to solving both of these issues.
2: A pedal extremely loosely based on the V5 opamp big muff that actually sounds more like an HM-2. This one is almost ready. Just needs some minor tone stack tweaks.
3: a range of expression jack compatible control pedals. May include things like simple switches to toggle between settings and possibly external LFO boxes to add modulation of any parameter controllable through an expression jack. They’d be small, simple, and cheap.

Come mid September, please feel free to pester me about this stuff.


Sorry about the novel,
Darrell

So this is happening…
MIM Classic and road worn Jazzmasters and Jaguars.
Vintage “correct” trem placement, AV65 pickups, some sort of vintage style bridge (not an adjustomatic). Hopefully more finishes than these…
Leaked for pre-order - http://www.nstuffmusic.com/m-2-fender.aspx